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Dr. Cash was brought in to the Cleveland Clinic Florida to teach surgeons and anesthesiologists about music and surgery

More and more people around the world are becoming aware of the many benefits of music during surgery.   It’s  a strange paradox because you know that music affects you powerfully and that you can easily reach for the music you love best, whether to relax you or energize you.  However, you have been told by “the professionals” that when you’re under general anesthesia that your hearing chut downs and you can’t hear anything.  And so, for decades no one thought that music during surgery made any sense.

The problem is, there are hundreds and hundreds of personal stories from patients who have been under general anesthesia waking up and realizing that they did hear conversations going on.  Patients say that they heard things that they wish they had not heard.  There is no question that when people have certain surgeries such as joint replacement surgery–hip replacements, knee replacements, shoulder replacements–there is actually hammering, drilling and sawing going on.  Who wants to hear that?

Why is music during general anesthesia a good idea?  All because of the phenomenon of rhythmic entrainment!  Scientists have known of this powerful phenomenon for hundreds of years, but apparently, no one considered that if the patient listened through headphones to music that has a slow, steady pulse and a relaxing mood, that their heartrate and breathing would entrain or synchronize with that music and keep the patient more relaxed.  When the patient is more relaxed, less anesthesia and analgesia is needed and the patient can have a safer procedure and return to work or home faster. 

There are so many other benefits as well and also there are copious benefits for regional anesthesia, local anesthesia and for many other medical procedures.  Stay tuned for this unique and ground-breaking series on the use and benefits of music during surgery!  Also, feel free to post any questions or comments you might have!

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