Recent Research on Music and Surgery

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

There is so much data about the benefits of music before, during and after surgery. You can search by type of surgery or you can search by type of adjunctive intervention like music, relaxation tapes, aromatherapy or any of dozens of things! If you want to see some of the most recent, go to http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez. Just do a search for what interests you most. Please let me know how I can help you!
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

Research on Music with Surgery

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail

I’ve been talking about music with surgery for a long time and I believe that hundreds of thousands of people have paid attention and are now asking for music before their surgery. Looking at some of the clinical research is helpful too. Studies have been done around the world but here are two that I thought you might find interesting:
Unassisted music listening has also been studied with patients undergoing elective procedures using regional anesthesia to determine music’s effect on decreasing anxiety levels during surgery. Eisenman & Cohen (1995) studied patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. Patients reported that music listening during surgery helped make the time pass more quickly, masked background noises and diverted attention away from the surgical procedure. Anesthetists also reported that patients required less anesthesia, were calmer, and maintained more stable pulse rates and blood pressures.
In a similar study, Cruise, Chung, Yogendran & Little (1997) studied elderly patients who were scheduled for cataract extraction surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to one of four groups. Subjects in group one listened to relaxing suggestions; group two listened to white noise (level of normal noise in a quiet environment); group three listened to operating room noise recorded during a cataract operation; and group four listened to relaxing, classical music with sounds of nature. After surgery, no significant differences were noted in vital signs between any of the groups. No significant differences were found in STAI or VAS scores among the groups before or after surgery. Patients in group four did report being more satisfied with the surgery experience and feeling more relaxed than was reported by other subjects. Results of this study showed a subjective improvement in anxiety with music listening but lacked objective evidence to support music listening as an effective medium to decrease physiological responses caused by stress.
Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmailFacebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestlinkedinmail