Would you like to be part of my research?

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Would you like to be part of my research?
November 29th, 2008 · No Comments
All over the world, at any given moment, people are being told that they need to have surgery: back surgery, shoulder surgery, knee replacements, hip replacements, hysterectomies…you get the picture. For almost 20 years I have been assisting people who are having surgery to find the perfect music for them. Now I have created my surgical serenity headphones and downloads so that anyone can use music with their surgery at any time!
Now I need to gather some data specific to my surgical serenity music that I have chosen for my first-time-ever downloads of music for surgery. I need to get not only data, but testimonials! If YOU or someone you know is planning to have surgery, please let me know and I will send them a free download in exchange for some basic information about their before and after subjective experience of the procedure and a sentence or two about the experience.
I will offer this special, time-limited opportunity until I have gathered at least 100 testimonials. Get your requests in NOW!
Sincerely,
Alice H. Cash, Ph.D., LCSW

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Music before Day Surgery–are there benefits?

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This interesting research comes from England. Apparently many patients feel they’ve been abandoned as they wait for their surgery. If they were given their wireless, pre-programmed headphones prior to surgery, this would undoubtedly calm some of their pre-surgery jitters!

Gilmartin J, Wright K.
School of Healthcare Studies, Baines Wing, University of Leeds, Leeds UK. j.gilmartin@leeds.ac.uk

BACKGROUND: The rapid expansion in day surgery has facilitated a shift in surgical nursing intervention. The evolving evidence base has a major part to play in influencing nurse-led preassessment, information provision, pain management and postoperative intervention. However, the literature is characterised by a number of deficits: poor attention to patient experience from admission to discharge, anxieties evoked and the potential needs of patients are not well articulated. AIM: The purpose of this paper is to describe and interpret patients’ experiences of contemporary day surgery. METHOD: This hermeneutic phenomenological approach focused on the experience of 20 adult patients. Data was collected by using unstructured interviews. The transcripts were interpreted through the identification of four prevalent themes using the phenomenological method. FINDINGS: The themes that emerged from the data are emphasised, ranging from the feeling of empowerment during preparation, through apprehensions encountered and the feeling of abandonment in the preoperative waiting area, to recovery dynamics. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrates that the majority of the patients felt abandoned in the preoperative stage and nurses did not recognise the importance of ongoing psychological support. Therefore, it is crucial to strengthen the provision of emotional support and person-centred care in a day surgery context. There is also a need to be aware that environmental factors can impact on patient anxiety, promoting the use of music preoperatively can reduce anxiety and increase well-being. RELEVANCE FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE: Crucially health professionals need to facilitate person-centred and continuity of care throughout the day surgery experience. Using dynamic interpersonal skills, such as active listening ‘holding”containment’ and attunement to reduce anxiety and feelings of abandonment in the preoperative period. Moreover, being alert to verbal utterances, para-language and non-verbal cues demonstrated by the patient. Specific information about delays regarding the timing of procedures needs to be carefully explained.

PMID: 18705721

[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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How music affects the body during surgery

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Why use music during surgery? This is one of the frequent questions asked when I go out into the world and quite understandable. In our society, music is thought of primarily as entertainment. Yes, people put it on their iPod or car CD player or home stereo system to chill-out, energize, or just as background music to their day.
Our world is full of music: TV, radio, movies and the ubiquitous iPod but music can also have powerful therapeutic benefits. When used during surgery music can help make the heart rate steady, the breathing steady, and the blood pressure moderate and steady. As a result, you will need less anesthesia to stay relaxed and sound asleep during your procedure. If this sounds too good to be true, just Google “music and surgery research” to see the hundreds of studies that have been conducted on this. There is absolutely no doubt about music’s effectiveness!
If you’d like to get the music that I have carefully and scientifically chosen for surgery, click on the link in the upper left corner. You can download it directly to your iPod or other MP3 player! Don’t hestitate to contact me with any questions. Best wishes for your successful surgery!

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Nine questions to ask your surgeon before the procedure

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You know that music makes a difference in your surgical procedure, right? You can have live music but that’s a little harder that purchasing either the special music I’ve put together for you or my pre-programmed MP3 player, ready to go into surgery with you. Which do you want? Click on the ad in the top left corner to order! Thanks!

Nine important questions to ask your surgeon before your surgery.
Preparing for surgery can be a big undertaking. However, in the midst of your preparation don’t forget to get all your questions answered before the surgery. Write down questions if you have to and ask your primary care doctor or surgeon. Don’t be afraid to ask what you think is a silly question. To help you prepare for surgery, here are nine questions to get you started. Ask these questions before your surgery, as well as any others that come to mind.
1. What is done during the surgery?
Ask for a clear description of the operation. If necessary, ask the doctor to draw a picture to help explain exactly what the surgery involves. Find out if there are alternative surgical procedures. Are there alternatives to surgery? Sometimes surgery is the only way to correct the problem. But one option might be watchful waiting, to see if the problem gets better or worse.
2. How will surgery help?
A hip replacement, for example, may mean you’ll be able to walk comfortably again. To what extent will the surgery help, and how long will the benefits last? You’ll want realistic expectations.
3. What are the risks?
All operations carry some risk. Weigh the benefits against the risks. Ask about the side effects of the operation, such as the degree of pain you might expect and how long that pain will last.
4. What kind of experience have you had with this surgery?
How many times has the doctor performed this surgery, and what percentage of the people who have had the surgery had successful results? To reduce your risks, you want a doctor who is thoroughly trained in the surgery and who has plenty of experience doing it.
5. Where will the surgery be done?
Many surgeries today are done on an outpatient basis. You go to a hospital or a clinic for the surgery and return home the same day.
6. Will I be put to sleep for the surgery?
Your surgery may require only local anesthesia, which means that just part of your body is numbed for a short time. In case of general anesthesia, you are put to sleep.
7. How long will the surgery and recovery take?
Many surgeries can be done relatively quickly and don’t require an extended stay in a hospital. However, it may be different for your surgery, so you should ask. Also ask whether you’ll need to stay overnight in the hospital, or perhaps stay several days.
You’ll want to know when most people are able to resume their normal activities, such as doing chores around the house and returning to work. You may think there would be no harm in lifting a sack of groceries after a week or two. But there might be. Follow your doctor’s advice as carefully as possible. Also ask your surgeon if you’ll have any restrictions on what you can eat or drink before or after the surgery.
8. What will it cost me?
Health insurance coverage varies. You may not have to pay anything. You might have a deductible to meet. Or perhaps you’ll have to pay a percentage of the cost. The doctor’s office can usually give you information about this, but you also need to check with your insurance company. Be aware there will be both a surgeon’s fee and a hospital or facility fee — know the cost of both. Be certain to know if you are responsible for a flat copay — a set amount for the surgery — or if you have to pay a percentage of the bill. There’s a big difference.
9. Should I get a second opinion?
If, after asking all these questions and others, you still have unanswered questions, are unsatisfied with the answers or are still uncomfortable about surgery, you may want to consider the advice of another doctor.
A second opinion, also called a consultation, can be a good way for you to get some more perspective on your surgical options. If you seek a second opinion, do so with someone with expertise doing the surgery. Your primary care doctor may be able to help suggest someone for a second opinion. Keep in mind that a second opinion isn’t necessarily any better than the first one. If there’s disagreement, or agreement, between the two opinions, it’s still up to you to evaluate what choice you feel most comfortable with.

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