Music and Hernia Surgery

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Well, again my mother is having surgery. And this time, she is again having hernia surgery. When she had surgery for a strangulated hernia in May, she discovered that she is even more sensitive to not only anesthesia but also to pain meds. She was given morphine and it totaly knocked her for a loop. I am seriously wondering if because she listened to music through headphones during the surgery, she needed much less morphine but they didn’t think about this and just gave her what they would have given anyone else. She was seeing things that weren’t there and talking non-stop about whatever popped into her head.

This time I am suggesting that she take the same music she listened to during surgery and listen to it in her room for at least 2 or 3 days. The body’s memory of this music will help her to be calm and to relax. I’ll let you know how it goes!

Happy Holidays!

Alice

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How about Ipods in Surgery?

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Should you take your iPod into surgery? About a year ago, the site www.livescience.com had this to say:

If you’re headed for surgery, take your iPod.
A new study by the Yale School of Medicine confirms previous work showing that surgery patients listening to music require much less sedation.
Previous studies left open the question of whether it was music that did the trick, or just the act of blocking out the sound of dropped surgical instruments and other operating room noise.
In the new study, researchers tested 90 surgery patients at two facilities. Some wore headphones and listened to the music of their choice. Others heard white noise, that hiss and hum common to office buildings that’s designed to drown out harsh noises. Others had no headphones.
Blocking sounds with white noise did not decrease sedative requirements, the study found, music did.
“Doctors and patients should both note that music can be used to supplement sedation in the operating room,” said study team member Zeev Kain, a Yale professor in the Department of Anesthesiology.

This is significant folks. Listen up! And please let your doctor know as far in advance as possible that you want to use music through headphones or an iPod. You won’t regret it!

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Headphones for Surgery

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You probably remember that I am in the process of creating some special headphones for surgery. The patent is almost finalized but recently, I hit a little bump in the road. Seemingly out of the blue, it was brought to my attention that I would need FDA approval. At first I though “that can’t be right” but the more I have investigated it, the more I have found that it does seem to be true! It seems that if you’re making any sort of medical claim about a device, you must have FDA approval, whether it’s an invasive device or not. Interesting, eh?

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